Rolling through happiness on a bike

Rolling through happiness on a bike

Here’s something else I didn’t know: Some places allow cyclists to treat stop signs as yield signs and better yet, those places have not seen carnage on the roads.

It’s known as the “Idaho Stop” because it was first legislated there. Back in 1982. Since then that state has seen a significant decrease in bicycle injuries.

I’m familiar with rolling stops. I may even have, ahem, some experience doing it myself. I don’t bike a lot, but when I do, yeah, I don’t stop at every stop sign if there’s no traffic, duh. Because like the video above explains, and as everyone knows who’s ever been on a bicycle, it’s starting from a full stop that takes the most energy. If we have to stop everywhere we’ll get real tired real quick. It’s not everyone who wants a serious workout on their bike commute, you know.

What I also like about this idea is that it trusts cyclists to be smart about their own safety. It makes my inner libertarian very happy.

I don’t commute to work and if I did I’m not sure cycling would be my choice of active transportation (I like walking better), but for all those folks out there who’d love to bike to work if only it were a little less inconvenient, this approach might be just the thing to tip them over into the category of active commuters and allow them to leave the car at home.

A building for the car-less life

A building for the car-less life

Des mecs qui se trémoussent: et pourquoi pas?

Des mecs qui se trémoussent: et pourquoi pas?

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